Outline

Intention
  • Get people to be aware and look beyond the product they are consuming – production.
  • Practice ethical and environmental consumption/having the knowledge of its impact.
  • Choosing the right brand/company to be loyal to.
 
Context
  •  Hip hop/Basketball dudes
  • Sneakerheads
 
Focus
  • Brand loyalty. Loyal customers will consistently purchase from their preferred brands, regardless of convenience and price.
  • Collectors are unaware or will often turn a blind eye on production impacts they are loyal to.
  • A typical pair of sneakers generates 30 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to keeping a 100 watt light bulb on for one week, according to the new MIT-led lifecycle assessment. Two-thirds of it can come from manufacturing processes.
Here are some of the ethical and environmental issues companies have:
  • Corporate greed
  • The history of athletic shoes and the industry’s business model mean that when you try and select a suitable shoe you enter a vortex of exploitation issues.
  • OEM, the biggest manufacturer for the biggest sneaker brands has pushed out 83.4m pairs in the past three months alone.
  • Deconstruct the retail price: 150 processes needed to create a trainer make them one of the most labour intrusive items we own. just 0.4% of retail cost is spent on labour.
  • 2009 Greenpeace report: leather industry implicated major trainer brands in Amazonian deforestation.
  • They make $1.67 per hour
Outcomes
  • Certifications and accreditations: Fairtrade, Halal, Global Organic Textile Standard
  •  What if there was a tangible object for sale, something not very valuable and the proceed goes to charity?(series) Children in a playground building things
  • How much do we know about the products we buy? collectibles – limited screen prints?
  • Sneaker design with patterns that magnifies the reality of producing it.
  • Application for consumers that are able to determine production statistics

Signs – Meaning Making Process

Phase 1: Contextual Sign Making

Considering situational/cultural instances that you could make a sign for

Remaking a sign you’ve found to give it a local (Qatar/Gulf region)

Establishing Goals:
Efficient Systems
Learn – Gain knowledge
Analyze contexts, understanding
Greener Qatar? Campaign
Efficacy and functionality
Process
Convey a clear meaning
Ideas for the need of sign in Doha:
  • Drifting Zones
     Drifters drive/drift in places where people reside. It is unsafe for people. (fast, reckless,safety hazard)
  • Wifi Areas (Assembly points) (Warning: no wifi zone)
     Started with zones not reached by wifi. Internet connection has been a necessity, a basic need for people in the past few years, more so with the younger generation. There is a need for a systematized wifi network where it reaches every corner of the place. Not every corner in education city has network connection.
     While sketching, I have realized the change in our social behaviors, in groups, we tend to focus a lot of out attention staring at our screens and sharing something on the web to our friends.
  • Hijab photos
     Etiquette campaign for Doha behaviors. Narrowing down the these ideas to one that you could work on.
   From these three topics, while sketching, I found syntactic connections on wifi areas/our dependability and inability to detach from our mobile phones and assembly points. In the university, with the majlis, cafeteria, and other gathering areas, we see similarities on what once a social convergence. People even in big groups would be on their phones. From these observations, I thought of a way to communicate or perhaps, a social commentary on our behaviors in the present. Assembly points are areas where people gather in case of emergencies. Having to experience a fire drill recently, I saw people still on their phones on the way out of the building. This sign aims to limit our phone usage and a social commentary focusing on experiences rather than having the need to satisfying our virtual followers.
     Putting these signs in its respective locations, it will create a stronger context in certain situations. You would find that in social spaces like the university’s majilis area, the saffron hall, and cafeteria, where people come to together to congregate becomes a space for people to sit and use their phones.
     Having these signs up in an official way purposefully through the use of irony, showing them exactly what they are doing, criticizes groups of people collectively on their mobile phones. It opens our eyes to think critically about the unorthodox social norms of the present. It is an observation on how dependent people are on the internet (fairly so, you could argue).
INITIAL SIGN MAKING
signmaking3 signmaking2 sign-making
I have found these signs to have the most direct communication, ideally for global, official, and high vernacular contexts.
Next Phase: Developing signs based on its context
It started from the idea of assembly points, where coming from a personal experience, I saw a pattern in every group of people that gather together. These gave me the idea of discussing the topic of phone usage in events and situations in a social context. It started with sketches of the common sign we have for these, and wifi signs.
IMG_5219 IMG_5217 IMG_5216
From past critiques, I have done multiple variations and refinements of the man symbol which could be seen below:
IMG_4899 IMG_5012 Screen Shot 2015-10-01 at 12.05.27 PM
These refinements include unifying the visual language and gestalt through adjusting the line weight and form.
Unifying the line weight. Working more systematic and treating this illustrations holistically, putting them in order, in a way, designs a system. Adjusting line weight and visual hierarchy allow the audience for a more visual appeal and a more effective gestalt.
I have since refined the symbol of man and illustrated the app icons. In this case (high vernacular – low vernacular), the distinguishing factor between the two is the apps used. Some are meant for a more sophisticated demographic, while some are for a low vernacular audience.
signs
Working on this project gave me a whole new insight on semiotic learning, and more specifically on signs. From gathering of street signs to the final phase of this project, I saw a different perspective on signs. We see them everywhere and anywhere but the initial idea we have on signs are official (the most common we see). Understanding the context and your audience, you learn to adjust, not just the treatment of illustrations but the message you can convey as well. After all, the main aim you are trying to achieve is to communicate and elaborate the message in the most effective and easiest way possible.

Sneaker Head Industry, Collecting Subculture and its Impact

• Collecting Subculture – the sneaker head industry
     a sneaker head is a person who collects, trades, or admires sneakers as a hobby. The birth of sneakerhead culture in the United States came in the 1980s and can be attributed to two major sources: basketball, specifically the emergence of Michael Jordan and his eponymous Air Jordan line of shoes released in 1985, and the growth of hip hop music. The boom of signature basketball shoes during this era provided the sheer variety necessary for a collecting subculture, while the Hip-Hop movement gave the sneakers their street credibility as status symbols. Sneaker brands such as Nike and Adidas started a collecting subculture by releasing limited edition pairs, which makes the value of the footwear higher after the release date.
     While the boom of the sneaker collection industry is happening, footwear companies are slowly becoming a symbol of abusive labor practices. The business affects workers in developing countries, arguably negatively, and positively in some aspects. The outcome of this project is to give light to this subject.
Social commentary on a materialistic, consumerist society
Consumerist society as a social status
Limited edition products inflate their value because these companies control them/not necessarily superior in quality in comparison to non limited edition counterparts
Fur, crocodile skin, snakeskin as a social status
ORGANIZE:
Precedents, case studies, research = condition, situation, problem – topic keywords = design action, intervention, disruptions, design outcomes – audience, users, demographic – outcome research = effects, implications, outcomes, goal, change, impact
Look into the production of these products
LIST OF OUTCOMES
     Collectible sneakers
     Product Design
     Print will consist of children, pollution, low wages,
     toys/childhood
     What if there was a tangible object for sale, something not very valuable and the proceed goes to charity?
     (series) Children in a playground building things
     How much do we know about the products we buy?
     collectibles – limited screen prints?
     -look at sneakers/patterns and turn them into something more impactful and communicates the message

Potential Outcomes

An application where you could put stuff together to build a tricycle which will result give you a result where it is most probably be located in
Poster
A tool where you can personalize and design, it gives you the history and meaning of that said design
Lego inspired blocks to build and design your own
Website – history, tourism, mobility culture
Logo Design
Book/Magazine
Game
Art installation

Mobility Culture and its Adaptation to its Surroundings

When attempting to define the term ‘mobility culture’, first, it is necessary to agree to a common understanding of the term ‘mobility’. In this context, we understand mobility as the ‘ability to travel from one point to another’ and ‘actual physical travel’. Second, the term ‘culture’ can be defined as ‘the set of values, conventions, or social practices associated with a particular field, activity, or societal characteristic’.1 Combined, ‘mobility culture’ is, then, ‘the set of values, conventions, or social practices associated with the ability to travel from one point to another, and with actual physical travel.’
We see divergent differences in modes of transport as they have different characteristics and personalities. These differences are indicative and representative of a place’s lifestyles, energy, and social practices. This research is about low vernacular modes of transportation and how its characteristics and types change and adapt from locale to locale based on its environment.

Context Finding

• Automobiles as Identity in the Context of Global Identity Finding

     A city’s automobiles or public transport could easily say a lot about its identity and its people’s. The jeepneys in Manila, for example, is representative of the city’s energy, fast and condensed. Taiwan’s motorcycles get you from point a to b the most efficient way because of its narrow roads.

• Migrant Worker Rights in The Middle East – most of the blue collar workers do not know their rights.

     The sudden growth of Qatari economy has caused an influx of migrant workers into the country. This lead to setting immigrations laws in order to accommodate the growing number of worker population in the country. According to Human Rights Watch in June 2012 hundreds of thousands of mostly South Asian migrant workers in construction in Qatar risk serious exploitation and abuse, sometimes amounting to forced labor. The National Human Rights Committee was founded in 2002 with the responsibility of overseeing and carrying out investigations on human rights abuses in the country. The point is to let the workers know their rights and suitable agencies and institutions to help them.

• Collecting Subculture – the sneaker head industry

     a sneaker head is a person who collects, trades, or admires sneakers as a hobby. The birth of sneakerhead culture in the United States came in the 1980s and can be attributed to two major sources: basketball, specifically the emergence of Michael Jordan and his eponymous Air Jordan line of shoes released in 1985, and the growth of hip hop music. The boom of signature basketball shoes during this era provided the sheer variety necessary for a collecting subculture, while the Hip-Hop movement gave the sneakers their street credibility as status symbols. Sneaker brands such as Nike and Adidas started a collecting subculture by releasing limited edition pairs, which makes the value of the footwear higher after the release date.

Demystifying Chicken Man

Aside from the common societal issues and disorders in the present like ethnic discrimination, gender role stereotypes, and global warning, the most overlooked problem, in my opinion, based on its environmental, health, and ethical concerns is factory farming, also called intensive animal farming. In addition to the inhumane and barbaric treatment these animals go through, the unnatural feeds, hormones, and excessive quantities of antibiotics used on factory farms, according to farmsantuary.org, put the human population at risk for chronic disease, obesity, and drug-resistant bacteria, and pose the threat of major zoonotic disease out beaks.

Having to live in the Middle East region, one of the most common issue here is the human rights violations the majority of the labor, or blue collar workers go through due to the influx of migrant workers from the developing countries.

Looking closely to these issues, I found some connections, in varying degrees, and some are geared towards different aspects, such as; the environment, human rights, and health. These similarities include living conditions, isolation to the rest of society, disposability, very poor living conditions, disregard for health, inability to voice out, among many others.

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comparison